International Diamond Day – Celebrating the cultural role of Natural Diamonds

Some may wonder, Why an International Diamond Day? If there is justification for an International Pancake Day, then a day to celebrate the role of diamonds in the history and culture of humankind is long overdue.

Natural diamonds differ from other luxury products. Every stone is unique and billions of years old, created under extreme conditions in the belly of Mother Earth, each stone cut and polished to individual perfection.


It fascinated early cultures: Pliny the Elder (AD23-79) wrote: “Diamond is the most valuable, not only of precious stones but of all things in the world.” Since then, diamonds have occupied a special place in the culture of most nations.

Its association with love and appreciation started when Archduke Maximillian of Austria gave his beloved Mary of Burgundy a diamond ring as a betrothal gift in 1477. Today, the diamond engagement ring of a young couple carries as much magic as a great stone bought by a prince for his princess. Both are unique and gifted as a symbol of love and enduring relationships.

Image courtesy of Forevermark, by Imagemore Co., Ltd./Corbis

Every diamond that has warmed a woman’s heart or was bought as an investment, or saved a family from ruin, tells a story. It provides memories of special occasions and personal achievements, of passed loved ones, and it evokes a desire to preserve and celebrate a family’s heritage.

The significance and emotions associated with natural diamonds, the importance of its symbolism, and humankind’s need to own something rare and beautiful transcend international borders. Inevitably, the hardest, the purest, and most brilliant natural gemstone became embedded in the culture of most nations. Undoubtedly, the cultural significance and role natural diamonds play in the well-being of many developing countries demand recognition.